Workshops

2013 4 17 Lake Erie 1f Workshops

Lake Erie – 2013

I will be helping conduct several workshops next year (Death Valley, Bandon Oregon and Possibly Namibia) and want to live up to people’s expectations, so what are your expectations? Could I get your thoughts to a few questions about workshops?

1.  Have you ever attended a workshop before?

2.  Why or why not?

3.  How many?

4.  Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

  • Photographer conducting the workshop
  • Location
  • Focus of the workshop

5.  What do you hope to get out a workshop?

6.  Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.

7.  Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?

 

I would appreciate it if you’d copy these questions, paste them into the comments section and answer them.  Thanks for your experiences, thoughts and advice!

I’m in Russia right now and next Friday I’ll be in Split, Croatia for the opening of my exhibition “The Ghosts of Auschwitz-Birkenau.”

Cole!


23 Responses to “Workshops”

  • Jim Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? NO

    2. Why or why not? Much too expensive

    3. How many?

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 100%
    Location
    Focus of the workshop
    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. None

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Have Fun!

  • Dave Kosiur Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes

    2. Why or why not? For some, to get a guided tour of a particular location that I was not familiar with. For others, to work with a particular photographer or learn a technique.

    3. How many? 14 over 9 years, with one more coming this June.

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop: (None of the totals below will add up to 100%, sorry.)

    Photographer conducting the workshop 50-75%
    Location 25-50% (varies according to my answer to question #2)
    Focus of the workshop 10-20%

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? See my answer to #2.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.

    My most positive experiences have come from relations with the lead photographer during the course of a workshop. High on that list is thoughtful critiques of the images that I, and other participants, produce during the course of the workshop. Also, helpful hints in the field, both on technique and location, add to the positive atmosphere.

    On the negative side, my first workshop saw too much jostling between photographers as they sought the established “tripod holes” to shoot at iconic scenery. Also, in one workshop, we had classes on creativity, etc. but then were left on our own to find locations to shoot, with a minimum of guidance. That would now work for me as more experienced photographer, but it disappointed many us when we were beginner or intermediate photographers.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?

    Be specific as to the level of photographer at which you’re aiming the workshop. It’s difficult, if not impossible, to aim a single workshop at all levels of photographer. (I’d guess that your own workshops would aim at intermediate to advanced photographers.)

    (Cole: Feel free to contact me by email for any follow-up questions, etc.)

  • Henry Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before?
    Yes.

    2. Why or why not?
    Mostly to force me to get off my butt and do some photography, especially in places I’m very familiar with and at times I’d rather be sleeping.

    3. How many? Two multiday workshops in the Palouse region of Washington State and Idaho. Several one-day workshops in and around Seattle.

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 35
    Location 50
    Focus of the workshop 15

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    The opportunity to take great photos of interesting things. I also enjoy learning (and relearning) photographic and processing techniques.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    Positive – came home with photographs I’m excited to display, enter in competitions and even sell.
    Negative – It’s inevitable, but there always seems to be one or two people who are completely out of their depth in terms of skills and equipment and they tend to dominate the instructor’s time. You’ll have nine people with DSLRs and a working knowledge of their gear and one person with a five year old point and shoot who doesn’t know how to get out of auto.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    Make sure everyone gets at least some of your attention. Suggest everyone bring a copy of their camera manual and that they bring a decent tripod. It doesn’t have to be super expensive, but solid enough to stabilize their camera in windy conditions. Leave time for people to work on some of their images and share what they are doing in the course of the workshop. If you wait until the very end, you may find that they were making rookie mistakes and it’ll be too late to rectify the problems.
    Work on your patience and your sense of humor. I suspect you’ll do great in both departments.

  • Chris Maskell Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before?
    No

    2. Why or why not?
    Never had the opportunity / time

    3. How many?
    0

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop
    30
    Location
    40
    Focus of the workshop
    30

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    Appreciation of new technique

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    n/a

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    Prepare thoroughly, do a dry run with some friends / colleagues, maybe attend a workshop or 2 by experienced hands

  • Mike Green Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before?

    Yes

    2. Why or why not?

    Three so far: the first, as a ‘fast path’ to techniques, the latter two more related to the location, but with a hope and expectation of picking up new ideas for composition and approach. In all cases, I thought that the company of both the leader and the other participants would provide ideas, stimulate debate and generally be fun and conducive to all sorts of photographic learning: experience, essentially.

    3. How many?

    As above: 3

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop
    Location
    Focus of the workshop

    For me, this answer would vary from my first to my future workshops:
    First one: 50 / 10 / 40
    Subsequent two: 55 / 40 / 5
    Future: 75+ / 20- / 5-

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?

    As per answer 2, it varies over time. As someone technically competent (though clearly there are /always/ new techniques to learn!), my interest is much more towards time to discuss composition, approach and photographic style with firstly the leader and secondly the other participants. I see the whole, immersive experience with a complete focus on photography as being the main feature and the natural debate that ensues (and can be encouraged) is very helpful in forming new ideas for different directions. It’s also a good discipline, to be on some form of schedule with respect to shooting times; it’s an enabler in that respect. I hope to come away with a) some worthwhile images, b) some ideas for approaches and compositional styles which I do or don’t like (both are useful knowledge!).

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.

    Positive: excellent feedback from both the leader and other participants in all cases. Having the opportunity for honest critique is incredibly useful.

    Negative: this has been a very occasional issue on those I’ve attended, but any overly-prescribed schedule which prohibits ‘spur of the moment’ choices for location or for activity (discussion versus shooting) can be frustrating.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?

    I second a comment above: getting a group of people who have similar aims is highly beneficial to avoid discord, but also to engender good debate, effective critique and useful development of not only your but other people’s ideas. Ensuring people have a really clear idea of the nature of the workshop, the balance of shooting, critique, etc. by a comprehensive workshop description and suggested experience level is key.

    Also, I personally value critique sessions by the leader very much. Whilst a great location and sorting out the logistics via attending a workshop is a big bonus, and maybe all that is aimed for, the value of the leader and other’s critiques is a very big deal to me.

    Mike

  • Jan Armor Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes

    2. Why or why not? For inspiration

    3. How many?6 Maine Photo Workshops

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop33

    Location33
    Focus of the workshop33
    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    Total immersion, inspiration, and not having to worry about logistics.
    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    I come home from workshops charged up from Maine Photo Workshops. Great people, total immersion, photo camp for adults!
    On the negative side, per Henry, above, participants that are in over their heads take away from the experience. There’s always one or two who belong in Photo 101, f/stops and shutter speeds. One used to have to submit a portfolio to take “advanced” workshop in Maine. That’s gone by the boards. Now, if you have the bucks you can come.
    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Keep the workshop intimate and the footprint invisible as possible. The best workshops are those that inspire.

  • MariAnne Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? yes

    2. Why or why not? primarily to new locations

    3. How many? 2

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop see below
    Location
    Focus of the workshop

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? it varies; sometimes I’m hoping to learn something, sometimes I’m paying for the leader’s familiarity with the location

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. I enjoy being surrounded by others who share my passion for photography. I am sometimes frustrated by the pace or scheduling of workshop tours – want more time in some locations, less time in others. I have solved this for myself by adding a day or two on the end of my trips.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? The question to answer beforehand is what your objective is for attending a workshop – is it instruction? In that case, like any learning situation, the photographer leading the workshop is absolutely essential. If your goal is to go to a location and have the scouting and logistics taken care of, location is the driver (though the photographer’s ability to manage/organize is important).

    I’m curious Cole why you are considering attending workshops, especially Bandon and Death Valley. While all of us have things to learn, I can’t imagine that anyone can show you more than you have discovered in those two locations. ;)

  • Mylan Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? yes

    2. Why or why not? chance to learn in intensive environment, spend time with and observe process (shooting and post) of photographer I admire, meet like minded people, visit great locations for photography

    3. How many? 7 over several years

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop – 40%
    Location – 20%
    Focus of the workshop – 40%

    NOTE: I see the photographer and focus as often quite linked. For instance, it is likely i would not chose a workshop with Joe McNally if I did not like taking portraits or working with speed lights, not matter how much I admired him. Likewise, if Joe offered a landscape workshop, I would hesitate to take the class, to say the least.

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Generally, I hope to learn from the conductor of the workshop how he approaches the shooting process, problem solving, his/her creative process. If a location based workshop, I hope to get to good locations at good times of day. I also hope to learn from my fellow workshop participants (and I always do). Lastly, I hope to make a few new friends.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Negative – one workshop had a few students who had been with this instructor before. Generally, they hung out and talked most of the workshop. On one location based workshop while one a boat cruise of a scenic lagoon, the instructor took one favorite student got off the large tourist boat and into a smaller boat that went into hard to reach locations for just them 2 to photograph leaving the rest of us behind. Pretty insulting. Last negative, critiques sessions by one photographer consisted of only “great shot”, “very nice”, “like that one”, “good shot.” Positive – Same instructor in the above boat example gave wonderful, constructive review and critique sessions fairly often. He always made sure other students voiced ideas about the images being critiqued. Fantastic workshop in Norway where the instructor made sure to stop and talk to each participant at each location to exchange ideas about the scene, talk gear if appropriate and just generally be engaged with each student during each shoot.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Just be yourself and do what you would want someone to do for you on such a trip.

  • gerry toler Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before?
    NO.
    2. Why or why not?
    EXPENSE AND/OR DON’T CARE FOR CROWDS! BUT, HAVE SIGNED UP FOR A LOCAL WORKSHOP THAT DOES NOT INVOLVE TRAVEL, AND IS A SMALL SIZE GROUP.
    3. How many?
    NONE

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:
    •Photographer conducting the workshop 75%
    •Location 5%
    •Focus of the workshop 20%

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    WOULD EXPECT BOTH TECHNICAL AND ARTISTIC VALUE

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    NA

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    ABOUT THOUGHTS, I’D SAY KEEP THE GROUP SMALL, MAYBE 6 MAX. AND REQUIRE SOME SORT OF KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE SUFFICIENT TO THE SUBJECT.

  • Mike Nalley Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Only as an instructor.

    2. Why or why not?

    3. How many? Lots.

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 100
    Location 80
    Focus of the workshop 80

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Learn new techniques.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?

  • PAUL ST. LOUIS Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before?
    ONLY ONE.
    2. Why or why not?
    COST. I OFTEN FEEL I COULD BENEFIT MORE BY
    BUYING A GOOD PHOTOGRAPHY BOOK FOR LESS $$.
    3. How many?
    ONLY ONE.
    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each
    of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    ? Photographer conducting the workshop
    50%
    ? Location
    20%
    ? Focus of the workshop
    30%
    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    IMPROVED ARTISTIC VISION AND SHARPENED
    TECHNICAL SKILLS IN A NARROW AND FOCUSED
    AREA.
    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    WAY TOO MANY PARTICIPANTS AND TOO VAST A
    A SUBJECT AREA.
    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    SMALL GROUP OF PARTICIPANTS AND FOCUSED
    SUBJECT MATTER. IF POSSIBLE GO BEYOND
    WHAT ONE COULD LEARN BY UNDERSTANDING THAT
    WHICH YOU HAVE ALREADY TAUGHT ON YOU BLOG
    AND IN YOUR NEWSLETTERS. IS THAT POSSIBLE?

    MAY I SUGGEST A LOCAL WORKSHOP FOR YOUR FAITHFUL FOLLOWERS ALONG THE FRONT RANGE.

  • Susan Totte Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes
    2. Why or why not? To gain more knowledge in a particular area of interest or a specific location.
    3. How many? 10+
    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:
    Photographer conducting the workshop 40%
    Location 30%
    Focus of the workshop 30%
    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? I’ve done ones that concentrated on general techniques in capture/basic printing, and then gone on to advanced ones. I need a workshop that helps you further explore the individual’s personal vision.
    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Positives: Fun interacting with the small groups when we travel to sites. Negatives: Groups that are too large. The best one I ever went to was when there was a large dropout & we ended up with only 3 students. I really learned a lot!
    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Teach what you are known for doing already. When I signed up for your blog, one of the first things I asked you was about any workshops you gave. Can’t wait!

  • Susan Totte Says:

    By the way, I also love your choices of location as I connect with these same areas too. If you do change them, only add more.

  • Becky Peterson Says:

    will be helping conduct several workshops next year (Death Valley, Bandon Oregon and Possibly Namibia) and want to live up to people’s expectations, so what are your expectations? Could I get your thoughts to a few questions about workshops?

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? YES!!!

    2. Why or why not? To learn new techniques, share, meet new people with similar interests, expand my vision

    3. How many? 10-12

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    •Photographer conducting the workshop 100%
    •Location is important to proximity to where I live or have lived i.e. Bandon
    •Focus of the workshop yes learning new techniques

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Opening my eyes to see new things, sharing, friendship, new vision & perspective, immersion with environment

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Sometimes the leaders of workshops tend to spend more time taking their own pictures rather than teaching & sharing. You have such a unique way of shooting I would look forward to an affordable workshop with you.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?

  • Roger Says:

    Cole,

    First, how will folks be notified about your workshops and what will be the registration process? How can I maximize the chance of getting in? By any chance are you scheduling Bandon Beach for mid or late April or early May?

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes, with Friends of Arizona Highways and with Tony Sweet. To me, a photo “tour” has minimal training and is primarily designed to get folks to the right locations with the right conditions using local knowledge of weather, lighting, etc. A photo “workshop” includes the above but, in addition, the instructor is available for substantial guidance in the field and will also make classroom presentations concerning processing and other subjects.

    2. Why or why not? I’ve gone on tours primarily for efficiency, i.e., the pro knows when and where to go at what time and saves me substantial time in scouting an area I am not familiar with. I typically stay several days after the tour to re-visit spots on my own. I attend workshops because I want to learn new techniques either in capture or in processing and the pro can get me up the early part of the learning curve far faster than I can on my own.

    3. How many? Two with Friends of Arizona Highways and four with Tony Sweet

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Cole, very tough to answer because it largely depends on whether it is a tour or workshop and whether or not it is a location I have already been to and who the pro is. For purposes of the answers, let’s assume Bandon Beach with you (I’ve been once and plan to return,)
    Photographer conducting the workshop – 80%
    Location – 0% (any location with you would work for me)
    Focus of the workshop – 20%

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Some “aha” moments,, some breakthroughs in being able to see better and process better WITHOUT HAVING TO BECOME A PHOTOSHOP guru.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Positive – many “Aha” moments in processing with Tony Sweet and several good “capture” moments with Gary Ladd. Negative – too many folks participating, tripping over each other to try and get “the” shot that the pro has pointed out. Since I have come to realize that there is no such thing as “the” shot I just head off in another direction (Tony refers to me as “the free radical”).

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Size of the group is critical; classic student-teacher ratio issues (I am thinking workshop here as opposed to tour). There is a very important element to me that I have discovered and that is, even as a solitary person who is very comfortable being alone, that the interaction over meals, between shooting sessions and at other down times is very beneficial from both a photographic and a social perspective. While most folks attend workshops for the photography for quite a few the time away is a stress reducer, a quite time, a way to escape the everyday rat race that so many are faced with. I would not minimize the importance of this. I also have every time learned from other participants as well as the pro. The maximum for a single pro, in my opinion, should be 6 or 7. I think attendees fully understand that this means the cost will be greater than if the group was 10 or 12. Logistics – level of fitness should be described in detail. For example, at Bandon Beach there will be some folks that will have difficulty ascending the steps to the beach. Remote locations, even if using prepared trails can be problematic for some folks. I am a long time hiker but I have seen some very disappointed folks who simply could not get to “the” location. One pro once told me, only somewhat in jest, “If it’s not within 500 feet’ of the car, it’s not photogenic.” A great laugh at that workshop for me – part of the fun!

    I will follow with great interest what you decide to do.

  • nate parker Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Negative.

    2. Why or why not? Financial inadequacy has led to my inability to do those things.

    3. How many? -

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop -40%
    Location -40%
    Focus of the workshop -20%
    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? I would hope to mature as an artist and be inspired to explore new ideas.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. I once ran into a John Paul Caponigro workshop in session while out shooting one morning and I was a bit put off as to how seriously they were taking themselves, they were clearly under the effects of “the kool-aid” and were in no mood for my attempts at witty quips- clearly they did not know who I was! heheh. I think what I’m getting at is that I feel like sometimes workshops are exorbitantly expensive and may end up being more hero worship then an intensive learning experience? At least it would be for me at a C.T. workshop!>? heheh. I’m sure a workshop led by you would be an invaluable experience for me to attend (location or none) just I have a hard time parting with the usual 1500+ dollars, I think I would rather use that monies to travel on an intensive photographic journey and shoot all day- alone.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    -Free Schwag! Like t-shirts, stickers, hats, coffee mugs, etc- the value of free schwag can not be overlooked! And it makes one happier to give it than even receive it- I ran a free print giveaway last week on my bloggy and it was worth it in spades to see how people were responding to that!

    Maybe I’ll coincidentally be in Bandon surreptitiously at the same time your workshop is going on- and then I’ll take you out for beers. heheh.

    Good luck Mr. Cole and do a great job sir! -Nate!

  • Sam Blair Says:

    ed a workshop before? Yes, a few. Michael Levin; Sam Abel,Susan Burnstine.

    2. Why or why not? I constantly weigh the value of reading a great instructional book, for about $20.00 bucks, versus a workshop, the cost of which, including travel and lodging, can easily exceed $1000 bucks. For me, it’s how much bang for the buck can I get.

    3. How many? 5 or 6. I try to be very selective, and pass on most of them. Not yours, Cole. Sign me up right now for both.

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop
    Location: 75%
    Focus of the workshop 25%

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? As many mental “Ah Haa” moments as possible. I would like to leave the workshop with some sort of a mental paradigm shift in my thinking.I am looking for insight into how to think about making good images, as opposed to the basic technical stuff which can easily be mined from a book, such as shutter speed, depth of field, etc etc.Some of that is OK, but not as the focus of the ws. For a LE workshop, I’d love to also cover post processing. From Michael Levin I learned how much he processes his images, mainly dodging and burning, and how important that is for a great image. What to aim for, tonal contrast, etc, would be very helpful, particularly if tied to the gestalt of viewing images.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Negatives: (1)Self promoters; (2)those that don’t focus on changing or improving your thought process for producing what Sam Abel called “an image that lasts” (3) those who are afraid to be candid in the critiques. There’s a way to be candid and still be sensitive to a stranger’s feelings and pride. (4). I do not like the format where the instructor talks for an hour or so, and then the group moves like a herd of caribou to a shooting site and we all shoot the same or similar subject. I call it a photo gang bang, where most of the time is spent out shooting as a herd. For me, photography is not a team sport. For positives, just flip the negatives. The best format I ever experienced was 5 days with Sam Abel from National Geographic. His format was a morning to early afterenoon lecture, showing examples of his points from his and other’s work.

    Then he would give assignments for the afternoon to go out and capture what he had been discussing in the morning session. We would then go out on our own to shoot whatever we wanted on our own to practice and capture the idea behind the specific lesson.

    The next morning, the images from the prior day would be “deconstructed” by him, showing the good and bad, and how things could have been improved, plus Q and A. After that, he would move on to his next topic, and the process would be repeated.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? The proposed workshops are site specific, so it might be hard to avoid the herd issue, but if the mission is to capture the IDEA behind a lesson,rather than a specific scene, maybe not a problem. Both are big places, so people can spread out and find their own particular perspectives.

  • Sam Blair Says:

    Oops. For what its work, I answered on the wrong lines for Question 4. Should be photographer conducting WS: 75%. 25% on Focus of WS. Sorry.

  • Roger Says:

    Some additional thoughts. Specifically from you, I would want to learn about your post-processing and, I suspect, primarily your dodging and burning. Your “simple” approach to processing appeals greatly to me because, like you, I only learn a technique when I absolutely have to in order to do something with the image that I can’t yet do. Dodging/burning is not yet something I do well. The best processing teaching I have seen is when the teacher takes the initial, unprocessed image, states what he/she wants the end result to look like and then employs the various tools to get to the visualized end result. If there are some “standard” steps that you use on many/most images, a detailed written document to take home would be a great bonus. As to capture, I’d like to arrive out on Bandon Beach, have you do a kind of stream of consciousness brief lecture describing what you are thinking given the lighting, etc., then send the small group off to shoot for a couple of hours, process one or two images, and have you comment/critique.

  • Mark Levy Says:

    Hi Cole. Congrats on your show in Split. To answer your questions…

    1. Yes
    2. To learn new techniques, to practice others’ techniques, travel, camaraderie.
    3. 4-5
    4. 50%, 25%, 25%
    5. In addition to #2 above, new images.
    6. Created a relationship with a successful photographer; had a bored, disinterested group leader.
    7. Cole, I trust you to make it right!

  • bobbie Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes, as attendee and assistant.

    2. Why or why not? Assisted.

    3. How many? 3 or 4

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 40
    Location 0
    Focus of the workshop 60

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop?
    Technical information and application.
    Meet photographers.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop.
    I like to anticipate that the majority of the attendees are at about the same level of experience and are familiar with the basic equipment they bring along.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops?
    When overseas, perhaps offer to back up a particular size and number of of memory cards per student per day.

  • Bill Currier Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes, three tota plus a photo tour with a pro.

    2. Why or why not? Being able to trend a workshop puts me in a frame of mind where I am focused and do not allow work distractions. I take vacation days, leave the cell off and get lost in the moment. Also having a pro available excellerates the learning curve and subjects me to another’s vision and approach which stretches me.
    3. How many? Three. Two with Tony Sweet, one with Brenda Tharp and a day with Larry Lindahl.

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 50%
    Location 30%
    Focus of the workshop 20%

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Inspiration. I want to learn how’s the photographer sees, what is their vision and learn how they turn that vision into a final print. i also love to hear the stories of how they have evolved as a photographer and artist, how they started in the business and where do they see themselves in the future.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Positive, all the instructors were very personable and down to earth. Plus they all have a lot of practice knowledge and realize they are there to share that knowledge.

    Negative is sometimes the classes re too large, and certain students dominate the instructors time.

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Not specifically. Hopefully I can join you on a workshop one of these days. Best wishes to you and congratulations on the opening of your exhibition ”The Ghosts of Auschwitz-Birkenau”.

  • Lynne Says:

    1. Have you ever attended a workshop before? Yes, a few

    2. Why or why not? Two for location, two for specific techniques

    3. How many? 4

    4. Using a total of 100%, how important is each of the following to your choosing a workshop:

    Photographer conducting the workshop 50
    Location 40/10
    Focus of the workshop 10/40
    (depends on if I’m more interested in the location or the technique!)

    5. What do you hope to get out a workshop? Inspiration, new places, insights into my vision/voice and how to better express.

    6. Please tell me of a positive and negative experience that you’ve had at a workshop. Positive: Standing in a cemetery in the dark envisioning a light painting shot that came out as planned.

    Negative: Workshop instructor a) assumed everyone was of his political bent (NOT!) and b) endlessly insulted the other side (me, a paying customer). That guy lost a client for life. No politics!

    7. Any other thoughts or advice for me as I prepare for these workshops? Have one where I can attend! . I think the hardest part for an instructor is probably hitting the right balance of instruction and practice, and that balance seems to shift depending on the workshop focus. As long as the intent is clearly stated (no classroom, but will review if asked, or lots of instruction, less shooting) everyone can pick the emphasis they want.

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